Skip to main content

Golaghat Inundated By Heavy Flood

Golaghat Inundated By Heavy Flood

After excessive water was released by NEEPCO dam last week, a vast area of Golaghat district inundated by heavy flood which killed three people and caused damage worth crores of rupees.

The 2018 Dhansiri flood at Golaghat

People are emptying household goods from their houses amid flood water at Kathkotia village, Golaghat.


twitter

By Mithu Das   August 5, 2018

“I haven’t seen such devastating flood in my life,” said Asiq Haque, 16, with whom I met at Kathkotia village where I’d gone to visit the flood-hit area (on 2nd August, 2018). We were Standing knee-deep on the flood water which was fast flowing over the road in the middle of the village. Everything was under water—the houses, the newly sown rice paddy fields, the vegetable gardens, pastures, the roads and footbridges. Even the Dhansiri river—which flows near the village—disappeared into the horizon after it had mixed itself with muddy water.



“This is not the first time the Dhansiri has in full flood,” I told Asiq. “Golaghatians (people of Golaghat) had seen such heavy flood in the mid-nineteen-eighties, which was, ironically, not man-made—like this one. This devastating flood we’ve witnessed today is a result of NEEPCO’s decision to release excessive water from Doyang Hydroelectric Project dam.”

According to various news reports, Doyang Hydroelectric Project dam, which is situated in the hills of Wokha district in Nagaland, had opened their sluice gates last weekend (between 28th and 31st July, 2018). But as soon as the excessive water was released, it had directly struck dozens of villages on the banks of the Doyang river. The following day, the whole scenario of a vast land, which is spreaded over hundreds of kilometres on the banks of the Dhansiri river—from Uriamghat to Bokakhat—had completely changed. Hundreds of villages were submerged under water; thousands of people were forced to leave their houses; acres and acres of paddy fields were destroyed; cattle and farm animals were swept away; and, in many places, it was reported, the flood water flowed over the roads, destroying footbridges and leaving people stranded for hours and hours. Within two days, according to local newspapers, three people were killed by this devastating flood.

Although Golaghat, my hometown, which is situated near the Dhansiri river, was not directly affected by this flood, but some of its adjoining places were. Moinapara, Halmira and Kathkotia were a few among these places. Taking a camera with us, we’d visited each place to record the destruction caused by this devastating flood.

What NEEPCO says

In a statement issued by NEEPCO on 6th August 2018, which was published by several newspapers in Assam, NEEPCO said that due to the rains in the hills, which had continued for several days, the water level was rapidly increasing in Doyang Hydroelectric Project dam. However, District Administrator and District Disaster Management Authority of Golaghat were regularly being informed about the increasing water level. Unfortunately, by 25th July 2018, the water level in the dam reached 325 metres against its capacity of 324 metres. On the same day, said NEEPCO, government officials of Wokha and Golaghat district were informed about their plan to release the excessive water from the dam. And, on 27th July, at 5:30pm, the sluice gate of the dam was finally released. By 31st July, however, the water released from the dam picked up a speed of 1150 cubic metre per second, which, according to NEEPCO, was abnormally higher than previously recorded.

Moinapara Golaghat inundated by flood
A vast area of land is covered by flood water at Moinapara, Golaghat.
A flooded neighborhood at Kathkotia, Golaghat
A flooded neighborhood at Kathkotia.
Dhansiri Golaghat inundated by flood
People carrying their household goods to safer places, near Dhansiri river, Golaghat.
Flood relief camp, Halmira, Golaghat
Flood relief camp, Halmira.
Flood at Golaghat, Moinapara
Foods are supplied to flood victims by local charities at Moinapara, Golaghat.
The Dhansiri Bridge 2 No., Halmira, Golaghat
The Dhansiri Bridge 2 No., Halmira, Golaghat. Due to flood, the water level of the Dhansiri river was said to be increased several inches above the danger mark.
Rescue team at work, Kathkotia, Golaghaty
Rescue team at work at Kathkotia, Golaghat
The Dhansiri Bridge, Golaghat
People are quite amazed watching at strong current flowing on the surface of the Dhansiri river.

Mithu Das
Mithu Das, author of this blog, at Kathkotia village, Golaghat.

Report Abuse
Back to Top

Popular Posts


Margaret Atwood

Keep Yourself Working Odd Jobs Until You Attain Your Goal

Many famous people had to surmount major obstacles on their path to success. Odd job was just a part of their lives.



Pink-headed Duck

Pink-headed Duck: Is It Still Alive?

Pink-headed duck has gone extinct due to hunting and habitat loss. Last seen in the wild in 1949.



Durga Puja at Golaghat

Durga Puja at Golaghat

Like many other places in India, Durga Puja is also celebrated at Golaghat.





Rabindranath Tagore

A Song For Optimists

The patriotic song Ekla Chalo Re, written by Rabindranath Tagore, in 1905, is still remains as popular as it was 113 years ago.



Passenger Pigeon

The Sad Story of Passenger Pigeon

No matter how superabundant a species is, excessive hunting and habitat destruction can wipe it out within few decades.



Indian Wagtail

White Wagtail - A Common Winter Visitor to Assam

White wagtail is migratory bird found in Europe, Asia and Africa. Six species are found in Assam and NE India.


facebook   twitter   google plus   RSS Feed   Github button   National Geographic Your Shot

Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License